Category: DIPLOMA LEVEL 2 IN HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE

The RQF Level 2 Diploma in Health and Social Care (City & Guilds Courses 4222-21 and 4222-22) is an entry-level qualification for individuals that are already working in the care sector and want to learn more skills and take on more responsibility.

There are nine core units that must completed as well as a number of units that can be chosen dependent on the learner’s career plans, for example along with the generic pathway, there are also pathways for specialisation in dementia and learning disabilities.

Answers for the nine core units are covered in great detail on this website. They are:

201 Communication
202 Personal Development
203 Equality & Inclusion
204 Duty of Care
205 Safeguarding
206 The Role of the Health & Social Care Worker
207 Person Centred Approaches
208 Health & Safety
209 Handling Information

Demonstrate Ways of Working That Can Help Improve Partnership Working

Having good communication skills is essential for improving partnership working. Also, building strong relationships with others and giving accurate and timely information can help to build trust, which is also important to working effectively with partners. Knowing you own strengths and weaknesses as well as those of others and seeking training where needed can also…

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Explain Why it is Important to Work in Partnership with Others

Working in partnership with others is essential to provide the best possible care to an individual. Some tasks may require more than one person to execute safely and other tasks may require specialist training, qualifications or experience. Both would be impossible to complete alone. Seeking guidance from colleagues, managers and other professionals can improve the…

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Describe Different Working Relationships in a Health & Social Care Setting

There are many different working relationships in a health & social care setting. these can include: The relationship between support workers The relationship between managers and subordinates The relationships between employees and service users The relationships between employees and the family and friends of a service user The relationships between employees and other health &…

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Explain How a Working Relationship is Different From a Personal Relationship

The relationships a health & social care employee have at work differ greatly from the personal relationships they may have outside of work. Working relationships are governed by professional boundaries including:   Legislation (e.g. the Data Protection Act 1998 prohibits the sharing of personal information that an employee may be privy to as part of…

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Reduce Abuse

How to Reduce the Likelihood of Abuse

There are many ways to reduce the likelihood of abuse within an organisation.   Person-centred values is an approach to care work that all care staff should be encouraged to follow. It involves treating a client as an individual and including them in any decisions that need to be made regarding their care and support.…

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Two hands with the words 'Speak Out' written on the palms

Responding to Suspected or Alleged Abuse

If you suspect that an individual is being abused, it is imperative that you tell them of the reasons for your concerns and attempt to build a dialogue with them to try and establish what has happened. You should remain calm and listen intently to anything they may tell you without ‘putting words into their…

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Close up dictionary definition of 'abuse'

Types, Signs and Symptoms of Abuse

It is important to understand the different types of abuse so that you can spot the signs that it may be taking place and protect an individual from further abuse. The table below explains types of abuse and their symptoms. Type Definition Signs/symptoms Physical abuse Physical abuse occurs when an abuser makes physical contact with…

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Support the individual in their relationships and in being part of their community using person-centred thinking

I use person-centred thinking to support individuals in their relationships and in being part of their community. I do this by ensuring that individuals are free to make their own choices, although I will offer advice when I deem it necessary. I encourage individuals to play an active role in their local communities by providing…

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Describe How Challenges in Implementing Person-Centred Thinking, Planning and Reviews Might be Overcome

To be successful in implementing person-centred thinking, planning and reviewing requires commitment, tenacity and the ability to ‘think outside the box’. At the heart of the process is the client that you are supporting and it is your responsibility to help them reach their goals and achieve their dreams, sometimes using innovative ideas to lead…

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Identify challenges that may be faced in implementing person-centred thinking, planning and reviews in own work

In my own work, a challenge that is often faced when implementing a person-centred approach is that a particular client regularly changes their mind and an idea that they love one day, they might hate the next. Another challenge that I have faced is a lethargic client that had absolutely no interest in personalising the…

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