Two hands, one with a mobile phone and the other with a pen, representing digital and paper-based recording and storing

Follow agreed ways of working for: recording information, storing information, sharing information

This page is designed to answer the following questions:

Agreed ways of working are the policies, procedures and systems that your organisation uses. There will be rules that you must follow when recording, storing and sharing information. You have a duty to your employer to ensure that you adhere to them. If you are unsure how you should be handling information or you have concerns about the way information is handled, you should seek guidance from your manager.

Recording information

Whenever you record information, you should ensure that it is up to date, complete, accurate and legible. Your organisation may use computer-based systems or paper-based systems.

Storing information

Information may be stored digitally (computer-based) or physically (paper-based). Either way, it must be secured so that it is only accessible by authorised persons.

Digital information can be secured using robust computer systems that require a password to access. Other security such as firewalls and anti-virus software can give added protection.

Physical information may need to be secured behind a locked door or locked filing cabinet with specified key-holders. It is important to ensure that paperwork is not left lying around where unauthorised people may view it.

Sharing information

A lot of the information that you handle will be sensitive and confidential, so you should ensure that you only share it with those that need to know. This may include other care staff to enable them to carry out their role correctly or outside agencies. You may need to get consent from an individual if you are sharing their personal information (unless there are extenuating circumstances).

Example question and answer

Explain two ways of helping other practitioners to understand the different systems used to record information in adult social care settings.

There are several ways of helping other practitioners to understand the different systems used to record information in adult care settings.

You could explain the different systems to them or have them go on training to learn about them.

Another method would be to have them shadow you when you are using the systems so that they can watch and learn. You could then let them try to use them and monitor them to make sure that they do it correctly.