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Uses of professional supervision in performance management

This page is designed to answer the following questions:

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The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) has this to say about performance management:

Performance management aims to monitor, maintain and improve employee performance in line with an organisation’s objectives. It’s not a single activity, but rather a group of practices that should be approached holistically.

Performance management: an introduction – CIPD

For this assessment criterion, you will be required to explain and critically evaluate the principles of performance management with regard to several different areas. These areas are discussed below.

Existing systems and procedures

Existing organisational systems and procedures will aim to support the provision of high-quality, safe and effective care to service users. Part of this process will be to measure quality and continuously improve service provision. To do this, performance management systems will be required to identify organisational goals and objectives and support team members to understand them and help to achieve them, whilst improving their own practice.

The role of individual supervision

Individual supervision is a professional development tool and supports team members to identify, discuss and plan areas for their own development. This relates to performance management because team members that are clear about their role and responsibilities and have the resources, support and motivation that they need will be more productive in their work.

Setting organisational and individual performance indicators to improve and monitor the performance of individuals

After setting organisational and individual goals and objectives, you will identify performance indicators that will determine if a target has been achieved or activity has been successful. Performance can not be measured if performance indicators are not in place. For example, a team member may have the objective to set up a new service and the performance indicators may be based on them sticking to the agreed budget and launching the service by a specified date. Performance indicators should follow the SMART philosophy – they should be Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-bound. Progress towards goals should be reviewed during each supervision session, so that performance can be monitored.

Helping individuals set and achieve meaningful goals in respect of their practice

It is important that individual goals are in line with organisational goals, but it is also important that the individual is motivated to achieve them. As a leader, you will need to collaborate with the individual to ensure that you clearly define the organisation’s goals and help them to set personal goals that are in line with the organisations but also meaningful to them. This can be achieved by getting to know the team member and understanding what drives them and their aspirations. After setting goals, progress and performance should be reviewed regularly.

The development and measurement of a quality workforce with shared values and behaviours

The unit on leadership and management discusses the importance of developing a culture within your organisation that has shared values and behaviours. Shared values, such as honesty, respect and trust can support team members to work effectively with one another and in line with organisational objectives (which will be based on the same values).

You may use values-based recruitment to ensure that the values of new staff are aligned with those of the organisation. You will also want to embed values into all work-related activities, including training, team meetings and supervision.

Addressing conduct and performance

Inappropriate behaviour or inadequate performance will need to be addressed in a sensitive manner during the supervisory process. Team members should be clear about what is expected from them and when their work does not meet these expectations, both supervisor and supervisee should work in partnership to get standards up to an acceptable level.

For this to happen, there must be systems in place to monitor the performance of team members and identify areas that require improvement.

Aspiring to become an effective leader and manager with individuals and teams

The supervision and performance management processes will offer you opportunities to become a better leader and manager because it will involve developing relationships with your team and providing them with support, motivation and encouragement to achieve their objectives. As a manager, you will also have your own objectives and performance indicators, which should be aligned with organisational objectives as well as supporting your own learning and development as a leader and manager.

Assessment criteria

Learners explain and critically evaluate the principles of performance management with regard to:

  • Existing systems and procedures
  • The role of individual supervision
  • Setting organisational and individual performance indicators to improve and monitor the performance of individuals
  • Helping individuals set and achieve meaningful goals in respect of their practice
  • The development and measurement of a quality workforce with shared values and behaviours
  • Addressing conduct and performance
  • Key Performance Indicators (internal/external), CQC regulations
  • Aspiring to become an effective leader and manager with individuals and teams
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