Learn, Do Not Copy!

Effects of legislation and policy on practice

This page is designed to answer the following questions:

NOTE: Although this page has been marked as complete, it has not yet been peer-reviewed or quality-assured, therefore it should be considered a ‘first draft‘ and any information should be fact-checked independently.

Person-centred practice is a way of working that puts the individual at the centre of their care planning and delivery by promoting their rights, including the right to make their own choices and personalising their care to meet their unique needs, wishes and preferences.

Outcomes-based practice is an approach that focuses on the end result of care services or the impact that care services have on an individual’s life and well-being.

Both person-centred and outcome-based practice are enshrined in legislation and, therefore, should be referenced in your organisation’s policies and procedures. Below, we will look at some examples that highlight the association between these approaches and statutory frameworks.

  • Care Act 2014 – gives individuals maximum control of how their care needs are met (personalisation) and moves to an assessment process that focuses more on the outcomes that matter to the individual (see Care Act Factsheet, Department of Health and Social Care for more info)
  • Health and Social Care Act 2012 – requires Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) to promote the involvement of individuals in their care planning
  • Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014Regulation 9 ensures that care services are personalised (also a CQC fundamental standard)
  • Mental Capacity Act 2005 – protected individual’s rights to make their own decisions, giving them greater control

You should research other national policies and guidance that are aligned with person-centred and outcome-based approaches to care provision that are relevant in your own practice (e.g. the Valuing People White Paper, the NHS Plan, the Francis Report etc.)