Author: Dan

Explore with the individual ways of coping with situations and circumstances which trigger behaviour they wish to manage

Study Notes NOTE: This page also relates to 4.5 Work with the individual to identify and agree strategies and 4.6 Support an individual to develop and practise the agreed strategies Having identified the triggers of a behavioural response and the motivation to change it, you will want to work with the individual to find ways…

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Explain to an individual the positive outcomes of managing behaviours

Study Notes The previous post discusses working with an individual to find motivation for changing behaviours. It will also be useful to discuss with them some of the positive outcomes that you envisage from them managing their behaviour in a more positive way. Some examples of positive outcomes include: Having more friends/better relationships Intrusive interventions…

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Describe the methods and approaches available to help an individual manage their behaviour

Study Notes There are several methods and approaches available to help individuals manage their behaviour. Sometimes it may be necessary to try a number of methods to identify what works best for each unique individual. Some examples include: Discussion of possible consequences of behaviour whilst individual is at baseline Risk perception – helping an individual…

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Describe the relationship between legislation, policy and practice in relation to supporting individuals to manage their behaviour

Study Notes Legislation is the legal framework upon which policies are based. Care practitioners must ensure their practice adheres to local and organisational policies to ensure that they remain within the law and bet practice. Legislation such as the Human Rights Act means individuals are free to make their own choices even unwise ones. Policies…

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Work with others to review the approaches to promoting positive behaviour using information from records, de-briefing and support activities

The importance of documentation and record-keeping is realised when it comes to reviewing approaches and support plans for an individual. Using the information gathered from records, debriefings and activities, the support team and the individual concerned can come up with strategies to help promote positive behaviour and prevent challenging behaviour, which will contribute towards their…

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Describe the steps that should be taken to check for injuries following an incident of challenging behaviour

Following an incident of challenging behaviour, individuals should be checked for injuries, ideally by somebody that was not involved in the incident. If physical interventions were used, it is important to carefully check for injury on the areas where physical contact took place. First aid should be applied where necessary, however if first aid is…

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Describe the complex feelings that may be experienced by others involved or witnessing an incident of challenging behaviour

Having witnessed and been involved in quite a few incidents of challenging behaviour, I know that they can bring about feelings of anger, anxiety, upset, depression and guilt. They can also bring about positive feelings such as pride in how you handled a situation and improved self-confidence and self-esteem when you have done a good…

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Describe how an individual can be supported to reflect on an incident including how they were feeling after the incident

An individual can experience a wide range of emotions after an incident including embarrassment, anger, pain, guilt and sorrow. It is important that they have the opportunity to discuss these feelings to help them move on from what happened. By discussing these feelings, an individual will be able to apologise to anyone they have hurt,…

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Describe how an individual can be supported to reflect on an incident including the consequence of their behaviour

The individual should also be encouraged to discuss the consequences of their behaviour. these could be positive (e.g. they got they what they wanted) and/or negative (e.g. they damaged one of their possessions) and they will often be linked with negative feelings (which are discussed in the next question). In many cases, the consequences of…

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Describe how an individual can be supported to reflect on an incident including how they were feeling at the time prior to and directly before the incident

Part of my company’s Challenging Behaviour Policy is to have a post-incident review within 72 hours of the incident ending. This gives everyone involved (both clients and staff) an opportunity to speak frankly about what happened, how they felt (and still feel), the triggers that led to the incident and what can be done to…

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Demonstrate how to complete records accurately and objectively in line with work setting requirements following an incident of challenging behaviour

Following an incident of challenging behaviour, I am required to fill out an incident report and an ABC chart. These should be filled in objectively, sticking to the facts and be free from my own views and opinions about the incident.   The incident report is an objective and detailed account of what happened and…

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Demonstrate how to respond to incidents of challenging behaviour following behaviour support plans, agreed ways of working or organisational guidelines

The response required for incidents of challenging behaviour are person-centred and so will vary from individual to individual, as outlined in their support plans. For example, one individual I work with will cease their challenging behaviour if they are ignored, whilst another may need to be distracted with music.   As well as knowing and…

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Identify types of challenging behaviours

Types of challenging behaviour include:   Self-injury (e.g. headbutting a wall, biting own arm) Aggressive behaviour (e.g. hitting, screaming, verbal abuse, spitting towards others etc.) Inappropriate sexual behaviour (e.g. masturbating in public, exposing genitals etc.) Damage to property (e.g. breaking windows, kicking in doors, smashing up guitars etc.) Stealing

Evaluate the effectiveness of proactive strategies on mitigating challenging behaviours

As part of my job role, I observe and manage challenging behaviour and use this knowledge to implement proactive strategies that can mitigate future similar behaviours. This is an ongoing process and involves constantly working with the individuals concerned to establish what works and what doesn’t and tweaking the strategies where necessary.   Proactive strategies…

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